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Arthur Ilfeld House (1908-13) — 1053 8th Street

This house is considered to be one of the best examples of Jacobethan Revival architecture in New Mexico.


Historic Homes

Nothing distinguishes Old Town from “New” Town more than the architecture of the residential districts. Old Town has an Old World Hispanic quality with adobe and territorial style architecture that predates the arrival of the railroad. “New” Town, on the other hand, reflects the Anglo immigrants preference for Victorian architecture and brick and stone construction. With over 900 buildings on the National Historic Registry it is hard to see it all ... so we limited our visit primarily to the North New Town District and its incredible variety of historic homes.

We spotted this gem next door to the Arthur Ilfeld house on 8th Street. Unfortunately we were unable to find any information on this stately home.

D.T. Lowery House (1898) — 519 Washington

Quite possibly the finest Queen Anne style house in Las Vegas. Notice the complex roof incorporating three styles — hipped, gable, and conical. The spindle porch railings and conical corner tower are most impressive.

Lutz-Bacharach House (1884) — 1003 5th Street

If we were going to film a "haunted house" movie, this magnificent stone mansion ... built from of locally-quarried sandstone ... would be at the top of our list. Spooky!

Tipton-Rogers House (1902-08) — 1100 7th Street

As we turned the corner at Baca and 7th, we noticed a "For Sale" sign in front of this imposing brick World's Fair Classic style home. The realtor's flyer boasted features such as 6 bedrooms, 4400 square feet, stained glass windows, and bird's eye maple floors. We'll take it!

Sherry fell in love with this little beauty across the street at 1109 7th Street.

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